225BC Quality Authentic Ancient Silver Roman QUADRIGATUS Coin JANUS CHARIOT NGC

By admin, January 25, 2018

225BC Quality Authentic Ancient Silver Roman QUADRIGATUS Coin JANUS CHARIOT NGC
225BC Quality Authentic Ancient Silver Roman QUADRIGATUS Coin JANUS CHARIOT NGC
225BC Quality Authentic Ancient Silver Roman QUADRIGATUS Coin JANUS CHARIOT NGC
225BC Quality Authentic Ancient Silver Roman QUADRIGATUS Coin JANUS CHARIOT NGC
225BC Quality Authentic Ancient Silver Roman QUADRIGATUS Coin JANUS CHARIOT NGC
225BC Quality Authentic Ancient Silver Roman QUADRIGATUS Coin JANUS CHARIOT NGC

225BC Quality Authentic Ancient Silver Roman QUADRIGATUS Coin JANUS CHARIOT NGC
[6485] Roman Republic Anonymous moneyer Silver Quadrigatus (Didrachm) 24mm (6.65 grams) Struck circa 225-215 B. Reference: Cr-28/3; S-31; Syd-64; RSC-23 Pedigree: Dr. Ex: Stack’s Sale 12/1989, Lot #3221. Certification: NGC Ancients XF Strike: 5/5 Surface: 4/5 Laureate janiform head. Victory and Jupiter driving quadriga right, “ROMA” incuse on tablet. Provided with certificate of authenticity. CERTIFIED AUTHENTIC by Sergey Nechayev, PhD – Numismatic Expert. The quadrigatus was a medium-sized silver coin produced by the Roman Republic during the 3rd century BC. The obverse featured a young janiform bust and the reverse featured Victory driving a quadriga (four-horse chariot), giving the coin its name, with the inscription “ROMA” below. The coin weighed about 6.8 grams (6 scruples), consistent with a didrachma. The coin was minted from c. 241 to 235 BC until shortly before the introduction of the denarius (211 BC). Gold coins of similar style were issued at this time (staters and half-staters) which featured the same obverse type as the quadrigatus and the reverse type of two soldiers performing an oath over a third soldier holding pig, with the inscription “ROMA” below. The choice of Janus for these coins is believed to coincide with the closing of the doors of the Temple of Janus, indicating the absence of warfare, a rare occasion. Michael Crawford, however, has suggested that the janiform head represents the Dioscuri, since Janus is usually a mature and bearded figure. Roman-era historians such as Livy and Plutarch often refer to these early coins as denarii, but modern numismatic references consider these coins as anonymous Roman silver, produced before the standardization of the denarius around 211 B. The name quadrigatus comes from the quadriga or four-horse chariot on the reverse, which was the prototype for the most common designs used on Roman silver coins for the next 150 years. The victoriatus was a later coin of the same fabric that was valued at half a quadrigatus (3 scruples). In Roman mythology, Janus is the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings, endings and time. Most often he is depicted as having two heads, facing opposite directions; one head looks back at the last year while the other looks forward to the new, simultaneously into the future and the past. Janus was usually depicted with two heads facing in opposite directions. According to a legend, he had received the gift to see both future and past from the god Saturn in reward for the hospitality received. Janus-like heads of gods related to Hermes have been found in Greece, perhaps suggesting a compound god. The Romans associated Janus with the Etruscan deity Ani. Several scholars suggest that he was likely the most important god in the Roman archaic pantheon. He was often invoked together with Iuppiter (Jupiter). According to Macrobius and Cicero, Janus and Jana (Diana) are a pair of divinities, worshipped as the sun and moon, whence they were regarded as the highest of the gods, and received their sacrifices before all the others. In general, Janus was the patron of concrete and abstract beginnings of the world (such as the religion and the gods themselves), the human life, new historical ages, and economical enterprises. He was also the god of the home entrance (ianua), gates, bridges and covered and arcaded passages (iani) named after him. He was frequently used to symbolize change and transitions such as the progression of past to future, of one condition to another, of one vision to another, the growing up of young people, and of one universe to another. He was also known as the figure representing time because he could see into the past with one face and into the future with the other. Hence, Janus was worshipped at the beginnings of the harvest and planting times, as well as marriages, deaths and other beginnings. He was representative of the middle ground between barbarity and civilization, rural country and urban cities, and youth and adulthood. Numa in his regulation of the Roman calendar called the first month Januarius after Janus, at the time the highest divinity. Numa also introduced the Ianus geminus (also Janus Bifrons , Janus Quirinus or Portae Belli) , a passage ritually opened at times of war, and shut again when Roman arms rested. It formed a walled enclosure with gates at each end, situated in the Roman Forum which had been consecrated by Numa Pompilius. In the course of wars, the gates of the Janus were opened, and in its interior sacrifices and vaticinia were held to forecast the outcome of military deeds. The doors were closed only during peacetime, an extremely rare event. Livy wrote in his Ab urbe condita that the doors of the temple had only been closed twice since the reign of Numa: firstly in 235 BC after the first Punic war and secondly in after the battle of Actium in 31 BC. A temple of Janus is said to have been consecrated by the consul Gaius Duilius in 260 BCE after the Battle of Mylae in the Forum Holitorium. The four-side structure known as the Arch of Janus in the Forum Boarium dates to the 4th century CE. In the Middle Ages, Janus was also taken as the symbol of Genoa, whose Latin name was Ianua , as well as of other European communes. The item “225BC Quality Authentic Ancient Silver Roman QUADRIGATUS Coin JANUS CHARIOT NGC” is in sale since Tuesday, September 26, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Republic (300 BC-27 BC)”. The seller is “victoram” and is located in Forest Hills, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Composition: Silver
  • Certification: NGC
  • Culture: Roman
  • Material: Silver
  • Denomination: Quadrigatus
  • Certification Number: 4373046-022
  • Grade: XF

225BC Quality Authentic Ancient Silver Roman QUADRIGATUS Coin JANUS CHARIOT NGC

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