King of Bosporus Apurgus & Roman Emperor CALIGULA 37AD Ancient Greek Coin i61988

By admin, May 24, 2018

King of Bosporus Apurgus & Roman Emperor CALIGULA 37AD Ancient Greek Coin i61988
King of Bosporus Apurgus & Roman Emperor CALIGULA 37AD Ancient Greek Coin i61988

King of Bosporus Apurgus & Roman Emperor CALIGULA 37AD Ancient Greek Coin i61988
Item: i61988 Authentic Ancient Coin of. King, circa 14-38 A. Bronze’12 Units’ 23mm (5.51 grams) Struck circa 37/38 A. Reference: MacDonald 302; Anokhin 320; Sear GIC 5431; RPC I 1904; SNG Cop 24 V CC V, Bare head of Roman emperor Caligula right. Diademed head of Aspurgus right; monogram behind, IB (mark of value) before. Caligula was the popular nickname of Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (31 August AD 12 – 24 January AD 41), Roman emperor (AD 37-41). Caligula was a member of the house of rulers conventionally known as the Julio-Claudian dynasty. Caligula’s father Germanicus, the nephew and adopted son of Emperor Tiberius, was a very successful general and one of Rome’s most beloved public figures. The young Gaius earned the nickname “Caligula” (meaning “little soldier’s boot”, the diminutive form of caliga , hob-nailed military boot) from his father’s soldiers while accompanying him during his campaigns in Germania. The conflict eventually led to the destruction of her family, with Caligula as the sole male survivor. Untouched by the deadly intrigues, Caligula accepted the invitation to join the Emperor on the island of Capri in AD 31, to where Tiberius, himself, had withdrawn five years earlier. With the death of Tiberius in AD 37, Caligula succeeded his grand uncle and adoptive grandfather as emperor. There are few surviving sources about the reign of Emperor Caligula, although he is described as a noble and moderate ruler during the first six months of his reign. After this, the sources focus upon his cruelty, sadism, extravagance, and sexual perversity, presenting him as an insane tyrant. While the reliability of these sources is questionable, it is known that during his brief reign, Caligula worked to increase the unconstrained personal power of the emperor, as opposed to countervailing powers within the principate. He directed much of his attention to ambitious construction projects and luxurious dwellings for himself, and initiated the construction of two aqueducts in Rome: the Aqua Claudia and the Anio Novus. During his reign, the empire annexed the Kingdom of Mauretania as a province. In early AD 41, Caligula was assassinated as a result of a conspiracy by officers of the Praetorian Guard, senators, and courtiers. The conspirators’ attempt to use the opportunity to restore the Roman Republic was thwarted: on the day of the assassination of Caligula, the Praetorian Guard declared Caligula’s uncle, Claudius, the next Roman emperor. Tiberius Julius Aspurgus Philoromaios (Philoromaios means lover of Rome , flourished second half of 1st century BC & first half of 1st century AD, died 38) was a Prince and Roman Client King of the Bosporan Kingdom. The name Aspurgus is a name of Iranian origin. His name goes back to the Iranian words aspa (horse) and aspabara (horseman). Aspurgus was a monarch of Greek and Iranian ancestry. Aspurgus was the son born to the ruling Monarchs Asander and Dynamis. He was the maternal grandchild to the previous ruling Roman Client King of the Bosporan and Pontus, Pharnaces II and his Sarmatian wife. His maternal grandfather was the youngest son and child born to King Mithridates VI of Pontus from his first wife, his sister Queen Laodice. He was born and raised in the Bosporan Kingdom. In 17 BC the father of Aspurgus, Asander had died of voluntary starvation from despair at the age of 93 because Asander witnessed his troops desert him to the Roman usurper, Scribonius. Scribonius pretended to be a relative of the legitimate heir Dynamis, so he could seize Asander’s throne and become Bosporan King. Dynamis became compelled to marry Scribonius. The Roman statesman Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa discovered Scribonius’ deception and intervened in the situation. Agrippa appointed Polemon I of Pontus as the new Bosporan King. Dynamis married Polemon I as her second husband, thus Polemon I became a stepfather to Aspurgus. Dynamis died in 14 BC and Polemon I ruled as Bosporan King until his death in 8 BC. After the death of Polemon I, Aspurgus succeeded his stepfather. Little is known on Aspurgus’ reign; however he seemed to have been a strong and capable ruler. Due to previous dynastic conflicts during the Roman Republic and around the period of Asander’s death, the first Roman Emperor Augustus and the Roman Senate finally in 14, accepted Aspurgus as the legitimate Bosporan King. Aspurgus adopted the Roman names “Tiberius Julius”, because he received Roman citizenship and enjoyed the patronage of Augustus and his heir Tiberius. Aspurgus married a Thracian Princess called Gepaepyris. Gepaepyris bore Aspurgus two sons who were. Tiberius Julius Mithridates – Mithridates was named in honor of Mithridates VI and he died in 68. Tiberius Julius Cotys I – Cotys was named in honor of his late maternal grandfather, Thracian King Cotys VIII. Through their second son, Aspurgus and Gepaepyris would have various descendants ruling the Bosporan Kingdom until the mid-4th century. The successors of Aspurgus bore the name Tiberius Julius to show their connection and ancestry with him. Aspurgus reigned until he died in 38. After his death, Gepaepyris ruled with their first son. World-renowned expert numismatist, enthusiast, author and dealer in authentic ancient Greek, ancient Roman, ancient Byzantine, world coins & more. Ilya Zlobin is an independent individual who has a passion for coin collecting, research and understanding the importance of the historical context and significance all coins and objects represent. Send me a message about this and I can update your invoice should you want this method. Getting your order to you, quickly and securely is a top priority and is taken seriously here. Great care is taken in packaging and mailing every item securely and quickly. What is a certificate of authenticity and what guarantees do you give that the item is authentic? You will be very happy with what you get with the COA; a professional presentation of the coin, with all of the relevant information and a picture of the coin you saw in the listing. Additionally, the coin is inside it’s own protective coin flip (holder), with a 2×2 inch description of the coin matching the individual number on the COA. Whether your goal is to collect or give the item as a gift, coins presented like this could be more prized and valued higher than items that were not given such care and attention to. When should I leave feedback? Please don’t leave any negative feedbacks, as it happens sometimes that people rush to leave feedback before letting sufficient time for their order to arrive. The matter of fact is that any issues can be resolved, as reputation is most important to me. My goal is to provide superior products and quality of service. How and where do I learn more about collecting ancient coins? Visit the “Guide on How to Use My Store”. For on an overview about using my store, with additional information and links to all other parts of my store which may include educational information on topics you are looking for. The item “King of Bosporus Apurgus & Roman Emperor CALIGULA 37AD Ancient Greek Coin i61988″ is in sale since Monday, May 29, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Greek (450 BC-100 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Culture: Greek
  • Coin Type: Ancient

King of Bosporus Apurgus & Roman Emperor CALIGULA 37AD Ancient Greek Coin i61988