GETA as Caesar 202AD Authentic Ancient Roman Coin Lituus, jug, knife i41312

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GETA as Caesar 202AD Authentic Ancient Roman Coin Lituus, jug, knife i41312
GETA as Caesar 202AD Authentic Ancient Roman Coin Lituus, jug, knife i41312
GETA as Caesar 202AD Authentic Ancient Roman Coin Lituus, jug, knife i41312

GETA as Caesar 202AD Authentic Ancient Roman Coin Lituus, jug, knife i41312
Item: i41312 Authentic Ancient Coin of. Geta – Roman Caesar: 198-209 A. Roman Emperor : 209-211 A. Bronze Denarius 18mm (3.17 grams) Rome mint: 202 A. Reference: RIC 107v (Septimius Severus), BMC 754v (Septimius Severus) PSEPTIMIVSGETACAES – Bare head and draped bust right. SEVERIPIIAVGFEL – Sacrificial implements: Lituus, jug , knife and simpulum. The augur was a priest and official in the classical world, especially ancient Rome and Etruria. His main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds : whether they are flying in groups/alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as taking the auspices. The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman societypublic or privateincluding matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices, that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices? A Simpulum , or Simpuvium , was a small vessel or ladle with a long handle from the Roman era , used at sacrifices to make libations, and to taste the wines and other liquors which were poured on the head of the sacrificial victims. The simpulum was the sign of Roman priesthood, and one of the insignia of the College of Pontiffs. The simpulum appears on a coin from Patras struck under Augustus. It is also placed before the head of Vesta , as a mark of that goddess, on a coin of the Domitian family, and is seen in the hand of a Vestal Virgin on coins of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. A man in a toga holds a simpulum in his hand on a coin of Antonio Drusi. It is commonly shown with the lituus and other sacrificial and augural instruments, on coins of Julius Caesar , Mark Antony , Marcus Aemilius Lepidus , Augustus , Caligula , Vespasian , Nerva , Antoninus , Marcus Aurelius , Caracalla , Publius Septimius Geta , Volusianus , Saloninus , Valerianus Minor , Domitius Calvinus and Pontius Pilate , as well as on many consular and colonial medals. An aspergillum (less commonly, aspergilium or aspergil) is a liturgical implement used to sprinkle holy water. It comes in two common forms: a brush that is dipped in the water and shaken, and a perforated ball at the end of a short handle. Some have sponges or internal reservoirs that dispense holy water when shaken, while others must periodically be dipped in an aspersorium (holy water bucket, known to art historians as a situla). An aspergillum is used in Roman Catholic and Anglican ceremonies, including the Rite of Baptism and during the Easter Season. In addition, a priest will use the aspergillum to bless the candles during candlemas services and the palms during Palm Sunday Mass. At a requiem , if a casket is present, the priest will sprinkle holy water on the casket. The aspergillum can be used in other manners where sprinkling of holy water is appropriate, as in a house blessing, in which the priest might bless the entry to the home. The name derives from the Latin verb aspergere’to sprinkle’. The form of the aspergillum differs in the Eastern Orthodox Church. In the Greek Orthodox Church the aspergillum (randistirion) is in the form of a standing vessel with a tapering lid. The top of the lid has holes in it from which the agiasmos (holy water) is sprinkled. In the Russian Orthodox Church the aspergillium is in the form of a whisk made of cloth or hair. Sometimes, sprigs of basil are used to sprinkle holy water. In some of the Oriental Orthodox Churches , no aspergillum is used, but the priest will pour holy water into the palm of his right hand and throw it on the faithful. A jug is a type of container for liquid. The term jug can also be used describe the breast of a woman, due to the fact that it holds liquid. It has an opening, often narrow, from which to pour or drink, and nearly always has some kind of handle. One could imagine a jug being made from nearly any watertight material, but most jugs throughout history have been made from clay, glass, or plastic. Some Native American and other tribes created liquid holding vessels by making woven baskets lined with an asphaltum sealer. The lituus was a crooked wand (similar in shape to the top part of a crosier) used as a cult instrument in ancient Roman religion by augurs to mark out a ritual space in the sky (a templum). The passage of birds through this templum indicated divine favor or disfavor for a given undertaking. The lituus was also used as a symbol of office for the college of the augurs to mark them out as a priestly group. , was a Roman Emperor co-ruling with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 to his death. Geta was the younger son of Septimius Severus by his second wife Julia Domna. Geta was born in Rome , at a time when his father was only a provincial governor at the service of emperor Commodus. Geta was always in a place secondary to his older brother Lucius, the heir known as Caracalla. Perhaps due to this, the relations between the two were difficult from their early years. Conflicts were constant and often required the mediation of their mother. To appease his youngest son, Septimius Severus gave Geta the title of Augustus in 209. During the campaign against the Britons of the early 3rd century, the imperial propaganda publicized a happy family that shared the responsibilities of rule. Truth was that the rivalry and antipathy between the brothers was far from being improved. Regardless, the shared throne was not a success: the brothers argued about every decision, from law to political appointments. Later sources speculate about the desire of the two of splitting the empire in two halves. By the end of the year, the situation was unbearable. Caracalla tried to murder Geta during the festival of Saturnalia without success. Later in December he arranged a meeting with his brother in his mother’s apartments, and had him murdered in her arms by centurions. Following Geta’s assassination, Caracalla damned his memoryy and ordered his name to be removed from all inscriptions. The now sole emperor also took the opportunity to get rid of his political enemies, on the grounds of conspiracy with the deceased. Cassius Dio stated that around 20,000 persons of both sexes were killed and/or proscribed during this time. What is a certificate of authenticity and what guarantees do you give that the item is authentic? Is there a number I can call you with questions about my order? When should I leave feedback? Once you receive your order, please leave a positive. Please don’t leave any negative feedbacks, as it happens many times that people rush to leave feedback before letting sufficient time for the order to arrive. The matter of fact is that any issues can be resolved, as reputation is most important to me. My goal is to provide superior products and quality of service. The item “GETA as Caesar 202AD Authentic Ancient Roman Coin Lituus, jug, knife i41312″ is in sale since Monday, June 30, 2014. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ruler: Geta

GETA as Caesar 202AD Authentic Ancient Roman Coin Lituus, jug, knife i41312