Divus-ANTONINUS-PIUS-161AD-CONSECRATIO-Pyre-Ancient-Silver-Roman-Coin-i57864-01-yr

Divus ANTONINUS PIUS 161AD CONSECRATIO Pyre Ancient Silver Roman Coin i57864

By admin, April 4, 2019

Divus ANTONINUS PIUS 161AD CONSECRATIO Pyre Ancient Silver Roman Coin i57864
Divus ANTONINUS PIUS 161AD CONSECRATIO Pyre Ancient Silver Roman Coin i57864
Divus ANTONINUS PIUS 161AD CONSECRATIO Pyre Ancient Silver Roman Coin i57864

Divus ANTONINUS PIUS 161AD CONSECRATIO Pyre Ancient Silver Roman Coin i57864
Item: i57864 Authentic Ancient Coin of. Antoninus Pius – Roman Emperor: 138-161 A. Divus Antoninus Pius Consecration Ceremony Issue under emperor Marcus Aurelius Silver Denarius 16mm (3.39 grams) Rome mint: 161 A. Reference: RIC 436 (Marcus Aurelius), S 5193 DIVVS ANTONINVS – Bare head right. Divus was the “Divine” or status of a god that emperors would achieve upon death, with the practice going almost all the way to the days of Julius Caesar in 44 B. Consecration Ceremony in Ancient Rome. The ceremony of consecration was very solemn and imposing. After the body had been clothed in the habiliments of death, it was placed on a bed of ivory; young men, chosen from the equestrian order, bore it on their shoulders to the pile. The Rogus, or Funeral Pile, is described by Dion, as a structure in the form of a turret, with three stories, of ivory and gold, and ornamented with statues. Herodian describes it as a mass of quadrangular shape, filled at the bottom with combustibles, on which again a second tier was placed of similar form and appearance, but narrower and furnished with openings; to this a third and a fourth were added, each gradually diminishing in size, till the whole resembled a watch-tower. The corpse being then introduced into the second layer or story, it was surrounded with aromatics and precious balms. The usual ceremonies being completed, a torch was applied, and the mass was consumed. After this apotheosis, the deceased emperor or empress had temples, altars, and priests dedicated to his or her honour, and the same worship was paid to the defunct, as paganism rendered to its gods and goddesses; whilst the Augusti, or Augustae, were thenceforth called DIVI and DIVAE. The form of the rogus, described as above by ancient writers, is brought to our view, with remarkable clearness, on numerous coins. This is a Julia Maesa, discovered at Rome; respecting which its then possessor, Viscount Ennius, a renowned antiquary, wrote to Garampi, papal nuncio at Vienna, that it is so well executed, and in such high preservation, that in the second layer of the funeral pile, the corpse of the empress is seen recumbent on a bed; a minute particular, never before distinguished in the monetal representation of these funeral structures. Antoninus Pius – 138-161 A. (under Hadrian) Augustus: 138-161 A. Titus Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus (19 September 86 7 March 161), generally known in English as Antoninus Pius was Roman emperor from 138 to 161. He was the fourth of the Five Good Emperors and a member of the Aurelii. He did not possess the sobriquet ” Pius ” until after his accession to the throne. Almost certainly, he earned the name “Pius” because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian ; the Historia Augusta , however, suggests that he may have earned the name by saving senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The item “Divus ANTONINUS PIUS 161AD CONSECRATIO Pyre Ancient Silver Roman Coin i57864″ is in sale since Monday, November 7, 2016. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
Divus ANTONINUS PIUS 161AD CONSECRATIO Pyre Ancient Silver Roman Coin i57864