ELAGABALUS-Authentic-Ancient-Silver-Roman-Denarius-Coin-w-CULT-STONE-OF-EMESA-01-qb

ELAGABALUS Authentic Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin w CULT STONE OF EMESA

By admin, May 1, 2019

ELAGABALUS Authentic Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin w CULT STONE OF EMESA
ELAGABALUS Authentic Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin w CULT STONE OF EMESA

ELAGABALUS Authentic Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin w CULT STONE OF EMESA
[6792] Elagabalus – Roman Emperor: 218-222 A. STONE OF EMESA Silver Denarius 19mm (3.22 grams) Antioch mint, struck 218-219 A. Reference: RIC 195; RSC 268; RCV 7545 Pedigree / Provenace: Ex Freeman and Sear Sale in 1999 ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. SANCT DEO SOLI / ELAGABAL The Holy Stone of Emesa flanked by four parasols, on triumphal car drawn r. Born in AE 205, Varius Avitus Bassianus, grandson of Julia Maesa (sister of Julia Domna) was appointed High Priest of Baal of Emesa in his boyhood. In 218 he was proclaimed Emperor by the Legions stationed in Syria. This uprising ended with the assassination of Macrinus and Diadumenianus. Elagabalus left for Rome taking with him the cult statue of Baal, the Holy Stone of Emesa. In Rome, he made Sol Heliogabalus the first god of the Pantheon. The cult statue had its home in the Eliogabalium on the Palatine. The reign of Elagabalus was characterized by his religious fanaticism which finally led to his assassination by the Pretorians in AD 222. Provided with certificate of authenticity. CERTIFIED AUTHENTIC by Sergey Nechayev, PhD – Numismatic Expert. Ls/, Aelagabalus , or Heliogabalus is a Syro-Roman sun god. Although there were many variations of the name, the god was consistently referred to as Elagabalus in Roman coins and inscriptions from AD 218 on, during the reign of emperor Elagabalus. Elagabalus was initially venerated at Emesa in. The name is the Latinised form of the Semitic Ilh hag-Gabal , which derives from Ilh “god” and gabal “mountain” (compare Arabic: jabal), resulting in “the God of the Mountain”, the Emesene manifestation of the deity. The cult of the deity spread to other parts of the Roman Empire in the second century. For example, a dedication has been found as far away as Woerden, in the modern-day Netherlands. The cult statue was brought to Rome by the Emperor Heliogabalus – Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, who, before his accession, was the hereditary high priest at Emesa and was commonly called Elagabalus after the deity. The n deity was assimilated with the Roman sun god known as Sol Invictus (“the Undefeated Sun”). A temple called the Elagabalium was built on the east face of the Palatine Hill to house the holy stone of the Emesa temple, a black conical meteorite. Herodian writes of that stone. This stone is worshipped as though it were sent from heaven; on it there are some small projecting pieces and markings that are pointed out, which the people would like to believe are a rough picture of the sun, because this is how they see them. Herodian also relates that Elagabalus forced senators to watch while he danced around his deity’s altar to the sound of drums and cymbals, and at each summer solstice celebrated a great festival, popular with the masses because of food distributions, during which he placed the holy stone on a chariot adorned with gold and jewels, which he paraded through the city. A six horse chariot carried the divinity, the horses huge and flawlessly white, with expensive gold fittings and rich ornaments. No one held the reins, and no one rode in the chariot; the vehicle was escorted as if the god himself were the charioteer. Elagabalus ran backward in front of the chariot, facing the god and holding the horses reins. He made the whole journey in this reverse fashion, looking up into the face of his god. Herodian’s description strongly suggests that the Emesene cult was inspired by the Babylonian Akitu-festival. The Emperor also tried to bring about a union of Roman and n religion under the supremacy of his deity, which he placed even above Jupiter, and to which he assigned either Astarte, Minerva or Urania, or some combination of the three, as wife. The most sacred relics from the Roman religion were transferred from their respective shrines to the Elagabalium, including “the emblem of the Great Mother, the fire of Vesta, the Palladium, the shields of the Salii, and all that the Romans held sacred”. He reportedly also declared that Jews, Samaritans and Christians must transfer their rites to his temple so that it “might include the mysteries of every form of worship”. Elagabalus – Emperor: 218-222 A. Elagabalus Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus, ca. 203 – 11 March 222, also known as Heliogabalus , was Roman Emperor from 218 to 222. A member of the Severan Dynasty, he was Syrian on his mother’s side, the son of Julia Soaemias and Sextus Varius Marcellus. In his early youth he served as a priest of the god Elagabal (in Latin, Elagabalus) in the hometown of his mother’s family, Emesa. As a private citizen, he was probably named Sextus Varius Avitus Bassianus. Upon becoming emperor he took the name Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus. He was called Elagabalus only after his death. In 217, the emperor Caracalla was assassinated and replaced by his Praetorian prefect, Marcus Opellius Macrinus. Caracalla’s maternal aunt, Julia Maesa, successfully instigated a revolt among the Third Legion to have her eldest grandson (and Caracalla’s cousin), Elagabalus, declared emperor in his place. Macrinus was defeated on 8 June 218, at the Battle of Antioch. Elagabalus, barely fourteen years old, became emperor, initiating a reign remembered mainly for sexual scandal and religious controversy. Later historians suggest Elagabalus showed a disregard for Roman religious traditions and sexual taboos. He replaced the traditional head of the Roman pantheon, Jupiter, with the deity of whom he was high priest, Elagabal. He forced leading members of Rome’s government to participate in religious rites celebrating this deity, over which he personally presided. Elagabalus was married as many as five times, lavished favors on male courtiers popularly thought to have been his lovers, employed a prototype of whoopee cushions at dinner parties, and was reported to have prostituted himself in the imperial palace. His behavior estranged the Praetorian Guard, the Senate, and the common people alike. Amidst growing opposition, Elagabalus, just 18 years old, was assassinated and replaced by his cousin Alexander Severus on 11 March 222, in a plot formulated by his grandmother, Julia Maesa, and carried out by disaffected members of the Praetorian Guard. Elagabalus developed a reputation among his contemporaries for extreme eccentricity, decadence and zealotry. This tradition has persisted, and in writers of the early modern age he suffers one of the worst reputations among Roman emperors. Edward Gibbon, for example, wrote that Elagabalus abandoned himself to the grossest pleasures and ungoverned fury. Niebuhr, “The name Elagabalus is branded in history above all others” because of his unspeakably disgusting life. The item “ELAGABALUS Authentic Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin w CULT STONE OF EMESA” is in sale since Thursday, April 4, 2019. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “victoram” and is located in Forest Hills, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Culture: Roman
  • Composition: Silver
  • Ruler: Elagabalus
  • Denomination: Denarius
  • Ancient Coins: Roman Coins
  • Coin Type: Ancient Roman

ELAGABALUS Authentic Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin w CULT STONE OF EMESA