CONSTANTIUS-I-Constantine-I-father-Ancient-Roman-Coin-Funds-Protectress-i18737-01-ia

CONSTANTIUS I Constantine I father Ancient Roman Coin Funds Protectress i18737

By admin, October 9, 2019

CONSTANTIUS I Constantine I father Ancient Roman Coin Funds Protectress i18737
CONSTANTIUS I Constantine I father Ancient Roman Coin Funds Protectress i18737
CONSTANTIUS I Constantine I father Ancient Roman Coin Funds Protectress i18737

CONSTANTIUS I Constantine I father Ancient Roman Coin Funds Protectress i18737
Item: i18737 Authentic Ancient Coin of. Constantius I’Chlorus’ – Roman Emperor: 305-306 A. Bronze Follis 28mm (9.45 grams) Siscia mint: 301 A. CONSTANTIVSNOBCAES – Laureate head right. SACRAMONETAVGGETCAESSNOSTR Exe: B/SIS – Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia. The cornucopia (from Latin cornu copiae) or horn of plenty is a symbol of abundance and nourishment, commonly a large horn-shaped container overflowing with produce, flowers, nuts, other edibles, or wealth in some form. Originating in classical antiquity , it has continued as a symbol in Western art , and it is particularly associated with the Thanksgiving holiday in North America. Allegorical depiction of the Roman goddess Abundantia with a cornucopia, by Rubens ca. Mythology offers multiple explanations of the origin of the cornucopia. One of the best-known involves the birth and nurturance of the infant Zeus, who had to be hidden from his devouring father Cronus. In a cave on Mount Ida on the island of Crete , baby Zeus was cared for and protected by a number of divine attendants, including the goat Amalthea (“Nourishing Goddess”), who fed him with her milk. The suckling future king of the gods had unusual abilities and strength, and in playing with his nursemaid accidentally broke off one of her horns , which then had the divine power to provide unending nourishment, as the foster mother had to the god. In another myth, the cornucopia was created when Heracles (Roman Hercules) wrestled with the river god Achelous and wrenched off one of his horns; river gods were sometimes depicted as horned. This version is represented in the Achelous and Hercules mural painting by the American Regionalist artist Thomas Hart Benton. The cornucopia became the attribute of several Greek and Roman deities , particularly those associated with the harvest, prosperity, or spiritual abundance, such as personifications of Earth (Gaia or Terra); the child Plutus , god of riches and son of the grain goddess Demeter ; the nymph Maia ; and Fortuna , the goddess of luck, who had the power to grant prosperity. In Roman Imperial cult , abstract Roman deities who fostered peace (pax Romana) and prosperity were also depicted with a cornucopia, including Abundantia , “Abundance” personified, and Annona , goddess of the grain supply to the city of Rome. Pluto , the classical ruler of the underworld in the mystery religions , was a giver of agricultural, mineral and spiritual wealth, and in art often holds a cornucopia to distinguish him from the gloomier Hades , who holds a drinking horn instead. In modern depictions, the cornucopia is typically a hollow, horn-shaped wicker basket filled with various kinds of festive fruit and vegetables. In North America, the cornucopia has come to be associated with Thanksgiving and the harvest. Cornucopia is also the name of the annual November Wine and Food celebration in Whistler , British Columbia, Canada. Two cornucopias are seen in the flag and state seal of Idaho. The Great Seal of North Carolina depicts Liberty standing and Plenty holding a cornucopia. The coat of arms of Colombia , Panama , Peru and Venezuela , and the Coat of Arms of the State of Victoria, Australia , also feature the cornucopia, symbolising prosperity. The horn of plenty is used on body art and at Halloween, as it is a symbol of fertility, fortune and abundance. Base of a statue of Louis XV of France. Juno Moneta, an epithet of Juno , was the protectress of funds. In Russian and Polish, “moneta” is the word for coin. As with the goddess Moneta, Juno Moneta’s name is derived either from the Latin monre , since, as protectress of funds, she “warned” of instability or more likely from the Greek “moneres” meaning “alone, unique”, an epithet that every mother has. Flavius Valerius Constantius March 31 c. 250 – July 25, 306, also Constantius I , was an emperor of the Western Roman Empire (305-306). He was commonly called Chlorus (the Pale) an epithet given to him by Byzantine historians. He was the father of Constantine the Great and initiator of the Constantinian dynasty. The Historia Augusta says Constantius was the son of Eutropius , a noble from northern Dardania in modern Serbia , and Claudia, a niece of the emperors Claudius II and Quintillus. Historians, however, suspect this maternal connection to be a genealogical fabrication created by his son Constantine I , thus connecting his family to two rather highly regarded predecessors. His father, however, might have been the brother of Eutropia, wife of Maximian. Under the emperor Carus , he was governor of Dalmatia , and Carus is said to have considered adopting him as his heir in place of his dissolute son, Carinus. In 293 the emperor Diocletian created the Tetrarchy , dividing the Roman Empire into Western and Eastern portions. Each would be ruled by an Augustus , supported by a Caesar. Diocletian became Augustus of the Eastern empire, with Galerius as his Caesar. Constantius was appointed Caesar to the Western Augustus, Maximian , and married Theodora , Maximian’s stepdaughter. They had six children. Constantius divorced his first wife (or concubine), Helena , by whom he already had a son, Constantine. Helena was probably from Nicomedia in Asia Minor. He was given command of Gaul , Britain and possibly Hispania. In 293, Constantius defeated the forces of Carausius , who had declared himself emperor in Britain and northern Gaul in 286, near Bononia. Carausius was killed by his rationalis Allectus , who took command of Britain until 296, when Constantius sent Asclepiodotus , a prefect of the Praetorian Guard , to invade the island. Allectus was defeated and killed, and Roman rule in Britain restored. Also in 296, Constantius fought a battle against the Alamanni at the city of Lingonae (Langres) in Gaul. He was shut up in the city, but was relieved by his army after six hours, and defeated the enemy. He defeated them again at Vindonissa (Windisch, Switzerland), thereby strengthening the defenses of the Rhine frontier. Diocletian and Maximian stepped down as co-emperors in 305, possibly due to Diocletian’s poor health, and the Caesars, Constantius and Galerius , became co-emperors. Constantius ruled the western empire, Galerius the eastern. Severus and Maximinus Daia were appointed Caesars. Constantine, who had hoped to be a Caesar, joined his father’s campaigns in Gaul and Britain. Constantius died in Britain, at York , in 306, and Constantine was declared emperor by the army. As the father of Constantine, a number of Christian legends have grown up around Constantius. Eusebius’s Life of Constantine claims that Constantius was himself a Christian, although he pretended to be a pagan, and while Caesar under Diocletian, took no part in the emperor’s persecutions. His first wife, Helena , is the subject of many legends, including the finding of the True Cross. Constantius’s activities in Britain were remembered in medieval British legend. In Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain (1136), he is sent to Britain by the Senate after Asclepiodotus, here a British king, is overthrown by Coel of Colchester. Coel submits to Constantius and agrees to pay tribute to Rome, but dies only eight days later. Constantius marries Coel’s daughter Helena and becomes king of Britain. He and Helena have a son, Constantine, who succeeds to the throne of Britain when his father dies at York eleven years later. The identification of Helena as British had previously been made by Henry of Huntingdon , but has no historical validity: Constantius had divorced Helena before he went to Britain. What is a certificate of authenticity and what guarantees do you give that the item is authentic? You will be quite happy with what you get with the COA; a professional presentation of the coin, with all of the relevant information and a picture of the coin you saw in the listing. Is there a number I can call you with questions about my order? When should I leave feedback? Once you receive your order, please leave a positive. Please don’t leave any negative feedbacks, as it happens many times that people rush to leave feedback before letting sufficient time for the order to arrive. The matter of fact is that any issues can be resolved, as reputation is most important to me. My goal is to provide superior products and quality of service. The item “CONSTANTIUS I Constantine I father Ancient Roman Coin Funds Protectress i18737″ is in sale since Wednesday, April 17, 2013. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ruler: Constantine I

CONSTANTIUS I Constantine I father Ancient Roman Coin Funds Protectress i18737