ANTONINUS-PIUS-150AD-Rome-Ancient-Silver-Roman-Denarius-Coin-TRANQUILITY-i53294-01-ty

ANTONINUS PIUS 150AD Rome Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin TRANQUILITY i53294

By admin, April 30, 2020

ANTONINUS PIUS 150AD Rome Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin TRANQUILITY i53294
ANTONINUS PIUS 150AD Rome Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin TRANQUILITY i53294
ANTONINUS PIUS 150AD Rome Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin TRANQUILITY i53294

ANTONINUS PIUS 150AD Rome Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin TRANQUILITY i53294
Item: i53294 Authentic Ancient Coin of. Antoninus Pius – Roman Emperor : 138-161 A. Silver Denarius 18mm (3.31 grams) Rome mint: 150-151 A. Reference: RIC 202 IMP CAES T AEL HADR ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right. TR POT XIIII COS IIII, Tranquillitas standing right, holding rudder and corn ears, TRANQ in exergue. In Roman mythology , Tranquillitas was the goddess and personification of tranquility, security, calmness, peace. Tranquillitas seems to be related to Annona (the goddess of the corn harvest from Egypt) and Securitas , implying reference to the peaceful security of the Roman Empire. In the Roman context, the characteristics of Tranquilitas reflected the values at the heart of the Via Romana (the Roman Way) and are thought to be those qualities which gave the Roman Republic the moral strength to conquer and civilize the world. Tranquillitas is often depicted with the attributes which seem to again hint at an association with the grain supply (and tranquility then of a placated and satiated population), a rudder and ears of grain, sometimes a modius or a prow, sometimes leaning on a pilaster (decorative column). The modius was a measuring device used to measure grain/corn. Both a rudder and prow are references to the ships which brought the grain harvest across the Mediterranean from Egypt to Rome. In that connection, Tranquillitas also seemed to have been the goddess of calm weather (very important for the transporting of the grain harvest). There even seems to have been a “Tranquillitas Vacuna” the goddess of doing absolutely nothing. In some representations (Roman coinage) Tranquillitas is depicted holding a hasta pura, a ceremonial lance (spear), the forerunner of the standard pilum issued to Roman soldiers, a reference to tranquility enforced/provided by the Roman military machine; or perhaps suggest a tranquil period for the Roman Armies which had been involved in frequent civil wars. In the other hand Tranquillitas is hold some sort of animal in her outstretched hand. Most experts believe to be a Roman Dragon (“draco”), a symbol associated with the military ensigns (banners) all of the Roman Legionary Armies during the period of the Empire, as well as by the Dacians and the Parthians. Again, this would be a reference to the tranquility afforded by the protection, fidelity, and valor of the Roman army. There is a dissenting opinion, that being that the animal held in Tranquillitass hand is not a dragon, but rather a capricornus , which would tie in with the maritime theme of the transportation of Egypts grain harvest across the Mediterranean to Rome. The capricornus was a marvelous animal with the forequarter of a goat with prominent horns and the hindquarter terminating in the tail of a fish, said in mythology to be a manifestation of Pan. According to myth, Pans transmutation into a capricornus was to escape the wrath of Typhon and occurred as Pan threw himself into a river. The capricornus was often depicted on Roman coinage in conjunction with a rudder, again tying to the maritime transport so critical in moving grain into Rome. Titus Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus (19 September 86 7 March 161), generally known in English as Antoninus Pius was Roman emperor from 138 to 161. He was the fourth of the Five Good Emperors and a member of the Aurelii. He did not possess the sobriquet ” Pius ” until after his accession to the throne. Almost certainly, he earned the name “Pius” because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian ; the Historia Augusta , however, suggests that he may have earned the name by saving senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. He was the son and only child of Titus Aurelius Fulvus , consul in 89 whose family came from Nemausus (modern Nîmes) and was born near Lanuvium and his mother was Arria Fadilla. Antoninus father and paternal grandfather died when he was young and he was raised by Gnaeus Arrius Antoninus , his maternal grandfather, a man of integrity and culture and a friend of Pliny the Younger. His mother married to Publius Julius Lupus (a man of consular rank), Suffect Consul in 98, and bore him a daughter called Julia Fadilla. As a private citizen between 110 and 115, he married Annia Galeria Faustina the Elder. They had a very happy marriage. She was the daughter of consul Marcus Annius Verus and Rupilia Faustina (a half-sister to Roman Empress Vibia Sabina). Faustina was a beautiful woman, renowned for her wisdom. She spent her whole life caring for the poor and assisting the most disadvantaged Romans. Having filled with more than usual success the offices of quaestor and praetor , he obtained the consulship in 120; he was next appointed by the Emperor Hadrian as one of the four proconsuls to administer Italia , then greatly increased his reputation by his conduct as proconsul of Asia. He acquired much favor with the Emperor Hadrian, who adopted him as his son and successor on 25 February, 138, after the death of his first adopted son Lucius Aelius , on the condition that Antoninus would in turn adopt Marcus Annius Verus, the son of his wife’s brother, and Lucius, son of Aelius Verus, who afterwards became the emperors Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus (colleague of Marcus Aurelius). On his accession, Antoninus’ name became “Imperator Caesar Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pontifex Maximus”. One of his first acts as Emperor was to persuade the Senate to grant divine honours to Hadrian, which they had at first refused; his efforts to persuade the Senate to grant these honours is the most likely reason given for his title of Pius (dutiful in affection; compare pietas). Two other reasons for this title are that he would support his aged father-in-law with his hand at Senate meetings, and that he had saved those men that Hadrian, during his period of ill-health, had condemned to death. He built temples, theaters, and mausoleums, promoted the arts and sciences, and bestowed honours and financial rewards upon the teachers of rhetoric and philosophy. In marked contrast to his predecessors Trajan and Hadrian , Antoninus was not a military man. One modern scholar has written “It is almost certain not only that at no time in his life did he ever see, let alone command, a Roman army, but that, throughout the twenty-three years of his reign, he never went within five hundred miles of a legion”. His reign was the most peaceful in the entire history of the Principate ; while there were several military disturbances throughout the Empire in his time, in Mauretania , Iudaea , and amongst the Brigantes in Britannia , none of them are considered serious. The unrest in Britannia is believed to have led to the construction of the Antonine Wall from the Firth of Forth to the Firth of Clyde , although it was soon abandoned. He was virtually unique among emperors in that he dealt with these crises without leaving Italy once during his reign, but instead dealt with provincial matters of war and peace through their governors or through imperial letters to the cities such as Ephesus (of which some were publicly displayed). This style of government was highly praised by his contemporaries and by later generations. German historian Ernst Kornemann has had it in his Römische Geschichte 2 vols. Bengtson, Stuttgart 1954 that the reign of Antoninus comprised “a succession of grossly wasted opportunities, ” given the upheavals that were to come. There is more to this argument, given that the Parthians in the East were themselves soon to make no small amount of mischief after Antoninus’ passing. Kornemann’s brief is that Antoninus might have waged preventive wars to head off these outsiders. Scholars place Antoninus Pius as the leading candidate for fulfilling the role as a friend of Rabbi Judah the Prince. According to the Talmud (Avodah Zarah 10a-b), Rabbi Judah was very wealthy and greatly revered in Rome. He had a close friendship with “Antoninus”, possibly Antoninus Pius, who would consult Rabbi Judah on various worldly and spiritual matters. After the longest reign since Augustus (surpassing Tiberius by a couple of months), Antoninus died of fever at Lorium in Etruria , about twelve miles (19 km) from Rome, on 7 March 161, giving the keynote to his life in the last word that he uttered when the tribune of the night-watch came to ask the password”aequanimitas” (equanimity). His body was placed in Hadrian’s mausoleum , a column was dedicated to him on the Campus Martius , and the temple he had built in the Forum in 141 to his deified wife Faustina was rededicated to the deified Faustina and the deified Antoninus. The only account of his life handed down to us is that of the Augustan History , an unreliable and mostly fabricated work. Antoninus is unique among Roman emperors in that he has no other biographies. Historians have therefore turned to public records for what details we know. Antoninus in many ways was the ideal of the landed gentleman praised not only by ancient Romans, but also by later scholars of classical history, such as Edward Gibbon or the author of the article on Antoninus Pius in the ninth edition of the Encyclopedia Britannicaca. A few months afterwards, on Hadrian’s death, he was enthusiastically welcomed to the throne by the Roman people, who, for once, were not disappointed in their anticipation of a happy reign. For Antoninus came to his new office with simple tastes, kindly disposition, extensive experience, a well-trained intelligence and the sincerest desire for the welfare of his subjects. Instead of plundering to support his prodigality, he emptied his private treasury to assist distressed provinces and cities, and everywhere exercised rigid economy (hence the nickname “cummin-splitter”). Instead of exaggerating into treason whatever was susceptible of unfavorable interpretation, he spurned the very conspiracies that were formed against him into opportunities for demonstrating his clemency. Instead of stirring up persecution against the Christians, he extended to them the strong hand of his protection throughout the empire. Rather than give occasion to that oppression which he regarded as inseparable from an emperor’s progress through his dominions, he was content to spend all the years of his reign in Rome, or its neighborhood. Frequently Asked d Questions. What is a certificate of authenticity and what guarantees do you give that the item is authentic? You will be quite happy with what you get with the COA; a professional presentation of the coin, with all of the relevant information and a picture of the coin you saw in the listing. Is there a number I can call you with questions about my order? When should I leave feedback? Once you receive your order, please leave a positive. Please don’t leave any negative feedbacks, as it happens many times that people rush to leave feedback before letting sufficient time for the order to arrive. The matter of fact is that any issues can be resolved, as reputation is most important to me. My goal is to provide superior products and quality of service. The item “ANTONINUS PIUS 150AD Rome Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin TRANQUILITY i53294″ is in sale since Wednesday, January 13, 2016. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ruler: Antoninus Pius
  • Composition: Silver

ANTONINUS PIUS 150AD Rome Ancient Silver Roman Denarius Coin TRANQUILITY i53294