JULIAN-II-The-Apostate-Coin-Roman-Emperor-BULL-360-363-AD-RARE-AE1-COA-01-cw

JULIAN II The Apostate Coin Roman Emperor / BULL 360-363 AD. RARE AE1 + COA

By admin, September 21, 2020

JULIAN II The Apostate Coin Roman Emperor / BULL 360-363 AD. RARE AE1 + COA
JULIAN II The Apostate Coin Roman Emperor / BULL 360-363 AD. RARE AE1 + COA
JULIAN II The Apostate Coin Roman Emperor / BULL 360-363 AD. RARE AE1 + COA
JULIAN II The Apostate Coin Roman Emperor / BULL 360-363 AD. RARE AE1 + COA

JULIAN II The Apostate Coin Roman Emperor / BULL 360-363 AD. RARE AE1 + COA
Roman Emperor Julian II Flavius Claudius Julianus The Apostate / Reign: 360-363 AD. Bronze AE1 Size: 27. Obverse: DN FL CL IVLI-ANVS PF AVG, cuirassed, pearl-diademed, & draped Julian II bust facing right.. Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above. In exergue: palm branch-ANT-palm branch. The Coin: A very pleasing Bronze AE1 it saw some use but still retains a. Remarkable amount of detail before it found a safe place to wait out the centuries. As grading is subjective please Judge the coin photos to determine this for. Julian II was Roman emperor from 360 to 363, as well as a notable philosopher and author. His rejection of Christianity, and his promotion of Neoplatonic Hellenism in its place. Caused him to be remembered as Julian the Apostate by the Christian church. Rise to supremacy In 351 Constantius II, perturbed by the death of his brother Constans and subsequent disorders. In the West, appointed Gallus as his caesar; that is, as his coadjutor and eventual successor. Gallus was a failure and was executed near Pola (now Pula, Croatia) in 354. Again in need of a caesar of his own house, after much hesitation summoned Julian from Greece. Whence the latter arrived still wearing his students gown. On November 6, 355, at the age of 23. He was duly proclaimed and invested as caesar, an honour which he accepted with justifiable. The emperor gave Julian his sister Helena as wife. She died after five years of marriage. The fate of their issue, if any, is unknown. Julian was at once dispatched to Gaul, where he. Proved a resolute and successful commander. He defeated and expelled the Alemanni and the. Franks, feats that aroused the jealousy of Constantius, who kept Julian short of funds and under. In 360, while Julian was wintering at Paris, the emperor sent a demand for a. Number of his best troops, ostensibly for service in the East but in reality to weaken Julian. Army thereupon hailed him as Augustus. This naturally infuriated Constantius, who refused any. Julian, realizing that war between himself and Constantius was now inevitable. Decided to move first. But, before the clash could come, Constantius died near Tarsus. (November 361), having on his deathbed accepted the inevitable by bequeathing the empire to Julian. Policies as emperor Julian , now sole Augustus, greatly simplified the life of the palace and reduced its expenses. He issued proclamations in which he declared his intention to rule as a philosopher, on the model. All Christian bishops exiled by Constantius were allowed to return to their sees. (although the purpose of this may have been to promote dissension among the Christians), and an. Edict of 361 proclaimed freedom of worship for all religions. But this initial toleration of Christianity was coupled with a determination to revive paganism and raise. It to the level of an official religion with an established hierarchy. Julian apparently saw himself as the. Head of a pagan church. He performed animal sacrifices and was a staunch defender of a sort of. Pagan orthodoxy, issuing doctrinal instructions to his clergy. Not surprisingly, this incipient fanaticism. Soon led from apparent toleration to outright suppression and persecution of Christians. Openly preferred for high official appointments, and Christians were expelled from the army and. Prohibited from teaching classical literature and philosophy. The latter action led Ammianus, who. Admired Julians virtues and was himself an adherent of the traditional religion, to censure the emperor: That was inhumane, and better committed to oblivion, that he forbade teachers of rhetoric and. Literature to practice their profession if they were followers of the Christian religion. Julian wrote an attack on Christianity, Against the Galileans, that is known today only by fragmentary. The trickery of the Galileanshis usual termhas nothing divine in it, he argues; it appeals. To rustics only, and it is made up of fables and irrational falsehoods. Here perhaps may be detected the. Sunset snobbery of the Athens of his day. Though professing to be a Neoplatonist and a sun worshipper. Julian himself was an addict of superstition rather than religion, according to Ammianus. His project to rebuild the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem was designed rather to insult the Christians than. To please the Jews, who, for long accustomed to the worship of the synagogue, would have found the. Revival of animal sacrifice acutely embarrassing. The plan was dropped when it was reported. (as it was on both an earlier and a later occasion) that balls of fire had issued from the old foundations. And scared away the workmen. Christian cities were penalized, and churches were burned in Damascus. Bishops, including the great Athanasius, were banished. One was horribly tortured. The Greco-Roman god associated with nature, wine, and ecstasy, was installed in the Christian basilicas. Of Emesa (modern im, Syria) and Epiphaneia (modern amh, Syria). At Antioch, where Julian was. Preparing for a campaign against the Persians, his closing of the great basilica and the removal of the. Relics of the martyr Babylas from the sacred grove of Daphne annoyed the Christians. Austerity did not endear him to the pagans, either, and both were equally incensed by his pamphlet. Entitled Misopogon (Beard Hater), in which he assailed the Antiochenes for the ridicule that they poured. On him for his personal conduct, his religion, and his claim to be a philosopher on the strength of his beard. DEATH: In 364, Libanius stated that Julian was assassinated by a Christian who was one of his own soldiers. John Malalas reports that the supposed assassination was commanded by Basil of Caesarea. Fourteen years later, Libanius said that Julian was killed by a Saracen (Lakhmid) and this may have. Been confirmed by Julian’s doctor Oribasius who, having examined the wound, said that it was from a. Spear used by a group of Lakhmid auxiliaries in Persian service. Later Christian historians propagated. The tradition that Julian was killed by Saint Mercurius. Julian was succeeded by the short-lived. Emperor Jovian who reestablished Christianity’s privileged position throughout the Empire. Julians religious policy had no lasting effect. It had shown that paganism, as a religion, was doomed. It is perhaps sad, in retrospect, that the odium of proving it should rest on Julian, who with a little less. Venom and more tact might have been remembered for his many virtues rather than for his two fatal blunders. Photos are of the actual coin that you will receive.. Please ask any question. If there is any issue pertaining to your order from us , please. Message us directly and we will resolve the matter as timely & smoothly as. My goal is always your happiness and confidence in purchasing my coin. In it’s authenticity, numismatic and historic value! Please allow up to 5-7 days for item to be delivered , Orders over USD 250.00. Please be sure your address is correct before paying for the invoice. As they vary from country to country. Especially for an international package. I stand behind this. Your happiness and confidence in purchasing this coin, in it’s authenticity, numismatic and historic. When should I leave feedback? Once you receive your order, please leave a positive. Don’t leave any negative feedbacks, as it happens many times that people rush to leave feedback. Before letting sufficient time for the order to arrive. All issues can be resolved, my integrity &. Reputation are very important to me! Certificate of Authenticity–(COA). What is a certificate of authenticity and what guarantees do you give that the item is authentic? Lifetime Guarantee of Authenticity , issued by the owner and Art-antique enthusiast that has identified. Thousands of ancient coins and has provided them with the same guarantee. You will be very happy. Additionally, the coin is inside it’s own protective coin flip (holder). Is to collect or give the item as a gift, coins presented like this could be more prized and valued. Higher than items that were not given with such care and attention. Due to the labor, time & expense that goes into creating & manufacturing each individual COA. With what you get with the COA; a professional presentation / description of the coin, with all of. The item “JULIAN II The Apostate Coin Roman Emperor / BULL 360-363 AD. RARE AE1 + COA” is in sale since Sunday, June 14, 2020. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “gardnergallery” and is located in San Diego, California. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Montserrat, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay, Russian federation.
  • Certification: JULIAN II. “The Apostate” Coin
  • Date: 360-363 AD.
  • California Prop 65 Warning: JULIAN II. “The Apostate” Coin
  • Year: 360-363 AD.
  • Composition: Bronze Coin
  • Ruler: JULIAN II. “The Apostate” Coin
  • Historical Period: Roman: Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)
  • Provenance: JULIAN II. “The Apostate” Coin
  • Denomination: AE1 Coin
  • Era: Ancient

JULIAN II The Apostate Coin Roman Emperor / BULL 360-363 AD. RARE AE1 + COA