TETRICUS II 273AD Ancient Roman Coin RARE Sacrificial implements i42986

By admin, January 2, 2019

TETRICUS II 273AD Ancient Roman Coin RARE Sacrificial implements i42986
TETRICUS II 273AD Ancient Roman Coin RARE Sacrificial implements i42986
TETRICUS II 273AD Ancient Roman Coin RARE Sacrificial implements i42986

TETRICUS II 273AD Ancient Roman Coin RARE Sacrificial implements i42986
Item: i42986 Authentic Ancient Coin of. Tetricus II – Roman Caesar: 273-274 A. Bronze Antoninianus 17mm (1.88 grams) Struck circa 273-274 A. Reference: RIC 255, C 48 CPETETRICVSCAES – Radiate, draped bust right. PIETASAVGG – Sacrificial implements. The augur was a priest and official in the classical world, especially ancient Rome and Etruria. His main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds : whether they are flying in groups/alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as taking the auspices. The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman societypublic or privateincluding matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices, that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices? A Simpulum , or Simpuvium , was a small vessel or ladle with a long handle from the Roman era , used at sacrifices to make libations, and to taste the wines and other liquors which were poured on the head of the sacrificial victims. The simpulum was the sign of Roman priesthood, and one of the insignia of the College of Pontiffs. The simpulum appears on a coin from Patras struck under Augustus. It is also placed before the head of Vesta , as a mark of that goddess, on a coin of the Domitian family, and is seen in the hand of a Vestal Virgin on coins of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. A man in a toga holds a simpulum in his hand on a coin of Antonio Drusi. It is commonly shown with the lituus and other sacrificial and augural instruments, on coins of Julius Caesar , Mark Antony , Marcus Aemilius Lepidus , Augustus , Caligula , Vespasian , Nerva , Antoninus , Marcus Aurelius , Caracalla , Publius Septimius Geta , Volusianus , Saloninus , Valerianus Minor , Domitius Calvinus and Pontius Pilate , as well as on many consular and colonial medals. An aspergillum (less commonly, aspergilium or aspergil) is a liturgical implement used to sprinkle holy water. It comes in two common forms: a brush that is dipped in the water and shaken, and a perforated ball at the end of a short handle. Some have sponges or internal reservoirs that dispense holy water when shaken, while others must periodically be dipped in an aspersorium (holy water bucket, known to art historians as a situla). An aspergillum is used in Roman Catholic and Anglican ceremonies, including the Rite of Baptism and during the Easter Season. In addition, a priest will use the aspergillum to bless the candles during candlemas services and the palms during Palm Sunday Mass. At a requiem , if a casket is present, the priest will sprinkle holy water on the casket. The aspergillum can be used in other manners where sprinkling of holy water is appropriate, as in a house blessing, in which the priest might bless the entry to the home. The name derives from the Latin verb aspergere’to sprinkle’. The form of the aspergillum differs in the Eastern Orthodox Church. In the Greek Orthodox Church the aspergillum (randistirion) is in the form of a standing vessel with a tapering lid. The top of the lid has holes in it from which the agiasmos (holy water) is sprinkled. In the Russian Orthodox Church the aspergillium is in the form of a whisk made of cloth or hair. Sometimes, sprigs of basil are used to sprinkle holy water. In some of the Oriental Orthodox Churches , no aspergillum is used, but the priest will pour holy water into the palm of his right hand and throw it on the faithful. A jug is a type of container for liquid. The term jug can also be used describe the breast of a woman, due to the fact that it holds liquid. It has an opening, often narrow, from which to pour or drink, and nearly always has some kind of handle. One could imagine a jug being made from nearly any watertight material, but most jugs throughout history have been made from clay, glass, or plastic. Some Native American and other tribes created liquid holding vessels by making woven baskets lined with an asphaltum sealer. The lituus was a crooked wand (similar in shape to the top part of a crosier) used as a cult instrument in ancient Roman religion by augurs to mark out a ritual space in the sky (a templum). The passage of birds through this templum indicated divine favor or disfavor for a given undertaking. The lituus was also used as a symbol of office for the college of the augurs to mark them out as a priestly group. Caius Pius Esuvius Tetricus (also seen as Gaius Pius Esuvius Tetricus but better known in English as Tetricus II) was the son of Tetricus I , Emperor of the Gallic Empire (270-274). In 273, he was raised to the rank of Caesar , with the title of princeps iuventutis , and in January 274 he started his first consulship , together with his father. After the defeat and deposition of his father in the autumn of 274, he appeared as a prisoner in Aurelian’s triumph , but the emperor spared their lives. According to some sources, he even kept his senatorial rank. The Gallic Empire Latin. Is the modern name for a breakaway realm that existed from 260 to 274. It originated during the Roman Empire’s Crisis of the Third Century. It was founded by Postumus in 260 in the wake of barbarian invasions and instability in Rome , and at its height included the territories of Germania , Gaul , Britannia , and Hispania. After Postumus’ assassination in 268 it lost much of its territory, but continued under a number of emperors and usurpers. It was retaken by Roman Emperor Aurelian after the Battle of Ch├ólons in 274. The item “TETRICUS II 273AD Ancient Roman Coin RARE Sacrificial implements i42986″ is in sale since Tuesday, September 2, 2014. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Roman\ Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)”. The seller is “highrating_lowprice” and is located in Rego Park, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Ruler: Tetricus II

TETRICUS II 273AD Ancient Roman Coin RARE Sacrificial implements i42986